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Michael Lipford

Lipford named director of Student Development

By | Faculty/Staff, Housing, Students | No Comments

Micheal Lipford will begin his new role as director of Student Development at Delta State on Sept. 1. Lipford has worked as Delta State’s assistant director of Housing and Residence Life for more than seven years. Additionally, he is currently serving as advisor to the National Pan-Hellenic Council and Order of Omega and director of Multicultural Affairs. 

Lipford, a native of Coldwater, Mississippi, is excited to begin this new role on campus.

This new journey will allow me yet another avenue to reach students and to make a positive impact on their lives,” said Lipford. “Housing and Residence has been such a big part of my life for so many years starting with my undergraduate years. It’s definitely a bittersweet moment, but I’m excited about this new role and the opportunity to advance my career in Student Affairs.”

Under the leadership of Dr. Vernell Bennett, Delta State’s new vice president for Student Affairs, Lipford will be assisting in the efforts to increase student engagement.

I believe Michael’s institutional knowledge and strong rapport with the students will serve him well in this position,” said Bennett. “As the director of Student Development, he will play an instrumental role in increasing student engagement and developing collaborations across the campus and in the community. His high energy work ethic and passion for student success will serve him well as he seeks to engage and support our students.”

Lipford graduated from Delta State in 2006 with a degree in real estate/insurance, and he completed his MBA at Delta State in 2010.

Dr. Sharon K. Hamilton (right), assistant professor of chemistry, works with Sarah Tierce of the Mississippi School of Mathematics and Science.

Hamilton host MSMS student for summer research

By | Academics, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty/Staff, Students | No Comments

Dr. Sharon K. Hamilton, assistant professor of chemistry, recently coordinated a two-week research experience at Delta State University for Sarah Tierce, a rising senior at the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science in Columbus.

Tierce, a Cleveland native, also worked with Katie Penton, a graduate student in Hamilton’s lab, as they explored the creation of a new degradable nanofiber that can be used in biomedical applications such as drug delivery and wound healing.

Tierce’s experience is part of a renewed effort to reestablish connections between the Delta State University Chemistry and Physics Department and the science faculty at the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science.

“Dr. Elizabeth Morgan, a chemistry teacher at MSMS, and I worked together to make this high school research experience possible,” said Hamilton. “Dr. Morgan helped identify interested and motivated students that would benefit from working in a research lab over the summer. I believe Sarah, a rising senior at MSMS, gained great insight into what research means and how a research lab functions.”

From left: Dr. Sharon Hamilton, Sarah Tierce and Katie Penton.

From left: Dr. Sharon Hamilton, Sarah Tierce and Katie Penton.

Hamilton added that this experience provides a great opportunity for high caliber students to learn about Delta State and its great learning atmosphere on campus and in the department.

“Moreover, this provided a chance for one of my graduate students, Katie Penton, to provide mentorship to a younger student — an invaluable skill in the workforce,” said Hamilton. “I would love to host more high school students in my lab. I believe it gives students a cutting edge when it comes to college applications, and it puts Delta State at the forefront of their mind when applying for colleges their senior year.”

The research is a collaborative effort between Hamilton and Dr. Gisela Buschle-Diller in the Department of Biosystems Engineering at Auburn University. The work is supported by the Mississippi INBRE, funded by an Institutional Development Award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under grant number P20GM103476.

Dr. Joseph Bentley, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Physics at Delta State, was also thrilled to rekindle the relationship with MSMS.

“Our department is very pleased to have a student from MSMS doing research with Dr. Sharon Hamilton this summer,” said Bentley. “Dr. Hamilton is our new organic chemist and is doing exciting polymer research. This collaboration is just one of several efforts reestablishing a connection with MSMS that our department enjoyed previously, in large part thanks to Dr. Henry Outlaw, who was instrumental in maintaining the DSU/MSMS relationship. In the past, faculty from MSMS helped DSU host education workshops for local Delta teachers and this is a tradition the Department of Chemistry and Physics and MSMS look forward to renewing. In the future, we hope to host more MSMS students in research experiences at Delta State.”

Learn more about the department at http://www.deltastate.edu/artsandsciences/chemistry-and-physics.

DSU Students receive Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship

By | Academics, Students | No Comments

JACKSON, Miss. – Andrew Van Velsor, a graduate of Delta State University and Senatobia native, was recently awarded the Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship valued at $30,000 per year for his medical training at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in Jackson at the annual scholarship ceremony. Van Velsor is the son of Donald Van Velsor of Southaven, MS. and Robin Peeler of Senatobia.

Meghan L.  Johnson, a graduate Co-Lin Community College and graduate of Delta State University and Crystal Springs native, was recently awarded the Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship valued at $30,000 per year for her medical training at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in Jackson at the annual scholarship ceremony.  Johnson is the daughter of Bruce and Selena Johnson of Crystal Springs.

Created in 2007, the Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship Program (MRPSP) is designed to provide more primary care physicians in rural areas of Mississippi.  During medical school, each MRPSP scholar receives $30,000 per year based on available funding. Consistent legislative support of the MRPSP translates to 60 medical students receiving a total of $1,800,000 to support their education this fall.  In addition to the legislative support, 5 privately funded scholarships are also awarded this year. Other benefits include personalized mentoring from practicing rural physicians and academic support.

Upon completion of medical training, MRPSP scholars must enter a residency program in one of five primary care specialties: family medicine, general internal medicine, medicine-pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology or pediatrics. The MRPSP Scholar must provide four years of service in a clinic-based practice in an approved Mississippi community of 20,000 or fewer population located more than 20 miles from a medically served area.

MRPSP provides a means for rural Mississippi students to earn a seat in medical school and to earn a $120,000 medical school scholarship in return for four years of service and learn the art of healing from practicing rural physicians.

For more information, contact MRPSP Associate Director Dan Coleman at 601-815-0564, jdcoleman@umc.du or http://mrpsp.umc.edu.

 

The Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship Program and the Mississippi Rural Dentists Scholarship Program are state-funded efforts to increase the number of physicians and dentists serving the health-care needs of Mississippians in rural areas. Housed at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, and collaborating with its schools of medicine and dentistry and the College of Osteopathic Medicine at William Carey University in Hattiesburg, the programs use various outreach, mentoring and training methods to identify, support, educate and deploy new generations of health-care workers for Mississippi’s underserved populations. To learn more about either program, click here.

 

 

take15_dsu

State financial aid now requires 15-hour course load

By | Academics, General, Students, Uncategorized | No Comments

Beginning in Fall 2016, undergraduates must enroll in and complete 15 credit hours each semester to remain eligible for state financial aid programs.

These programs require that students are considered full-time:

  • Higher Education Legislative Plan for Needy Students Scholarship (HELP)
  • Mississippi Resident Tuition Assistance Grant (MTAG)
  • Mississippi Eminent Scholars Grant (MESG)
  • Law Enforcement Officers and Firemen Scholarship (LAW)
  • Teacher Education Scholars Forgivable Loan (TES)
  • William Winter Teacher and Alternate Route Teacher Forgivable Loan (WWTS/WWAR)
  • Health Care Professions Undergraduate Forgivable Loan (HCP-UG)

Students registered for less than 15 credit hours should contact the registrar to add hours.

Here are some answers to commonly asked questions:

  • Summer hours cannot be added to Fall or Spring hours.
  • If enrollment drops below 15 credits before state aid is disbursed to the student, the aid will be cancelled for that term and the following term. If enrollment drops below 15 credits after state aid is disbursed to the student, the aid will be cancelled for the following term.
  • Students should not report their enrollment directly to the Mississippi Office of Student Financial Aid. Enrollment is reported by the institution on behalf of its students.
  • All credit hours for a given term must be completed at a single institution. Credit hours cannot be completed at multiple institutions for a single term.
  • Students with fewer than 15 credit hours remaining in the course of study may appeal for an exception for a single term. Students with 24 or fewer credit hours remaining in the course of study may appeal for an exception for two terms.  Instructions for submitting an appeal is provided below.
  • Students enrolled in certain programs with defined curriculum pathways (lock-step) should not apply for individual exceptions. Each institution will apply for program exceptions to apply to all students in such programs.
  • Exceptions will be made for students in certain majors that require clinical, practicum, or student teaching terms. Each institution is being advised regarding how to report enrollment for such terms.
  • All students, even athletes, will be impacted in the same way. In order to receive and continue to receive state aid, the student must take and complete 15 hours, regardless of whether or not the student is an athlete or on any other kind of institutional scholarship.

For more information please visit www.mississippi.edu/financialaid or call Mississippi Office of Student Financial Aid 601-432-6997 or 800-327-2980 (toll-free).

Delta State junior Tristan Ainsworth recently helped rescue a pilot who crashed his plane near Ainsworth's Moon Lake home.

Delta State student rescues pilot

By | Students | No Comments

It’s already been an eventful for summer for one Delta State student.

Tristan Ainsworth, who will be a junior this fall, responded to an accident scene on June 9 like any criminal justice major would.

Ainsworth was watching TV at his Moon Lake home when he heard a loud bang just before his power went out. The ruckus was the sound of a local pilot who had crashed his plane in the lake just beside his house.

“I walked outside and saw my neighbor sprinting toward the lake,” said Ainsworth. “I jogged down to the lake the best I could and jumped in to help. I didn’t stop and think about it. I saw the plane and just realized I needed to help.”

Ainsworth put on his good Samaritan hat without much thought, despite being in recovery from a recent car crash that broke his back.

“It was a straight gut reaction. I think anybody in the situation I was in at the time would have done the same thing,” he said.

Ainsworth’s humble actions were crucial as he and his neighbor helped pull the pilot out of the plane safely back to shore. According to Ainsworth, the pilot was slipping in and out of consciousness.

Ainsworth added that his training as an Eagle Scout helped prepare him for the rescue situation.

According to news reports, the pilot was flown to the hospital and was released the next day.

“I knew he needed help, and I knew that’s what I needed to do,” he added. “It’s the same type of helping hands we see on campus.”

Follow all Delta State news at www.deltastate.edu.