Highlight video from Winning the Race conference

By | Academics, Community, President, Winning the Race | No Comments

Delta State University hosted its fourth annual Winning the Race conference on March 28-29.

This year’s conference, “Winning the Race: Advancing Education in the Mississippi Delta,” was presented in partnership with the Casey Family Programs and the Mississippi Humanities Council and focused on identifying educational inequities and strengthening educational opportunities in the Mississippi Delta.

The inaugural program, spearheaded by Delta State President William N. LaForge in 2014, was designed as an innovative academic conference with a focus on engaging, promoting and rekindling conversations in hopes that Delta-area communities can move toward greater equity, forward thinking and reduced racial tensions.

In recognition of this work, the university received the 2014 Civil Rights and Social Justice Award accepted by LaForge at the fourth National Civil Rights Conference in Philadelphia, Mississippi.

Highlight speakers for the 2017 conference included Dr. Ivory Toldson, president and CEO of the Quality Education for Minorities Network, and Dr. William C. Bell, a Delta State graduate and president and CEO of Casey Family Programs.

The soundtrack for the video is an original song written and produced by students in the Delta Music Institute at Delta State. Performing the song is Audrianna Johnson, the 2015-16 Fighting Okra Records artist. The song was written by Johnson, Travis Calvin, Eric Johnson, Justin Boatman and Jessica Wishard, and Calvin served as the producer. It was recorded in Studio C at the DMI building on campus.

Photos Scanning Days hosted for Lebanese exhibit

By | Archives and Museum | No Comments

On April 3-4, the University Archives will host Photo Scanning Days as part of programming for the Lebanese in America exhibit.

Over the two-day period, guests are encouraged to bring in photographs related to Lebanese culture and heritage in the Mississippi Delta. Scanning will begin on April 3 at 1 p.m. and will continue until 6 p.m. On April 4, scanning will begin at 9 a.m. and will conclude at 3 p.m. The scanning stations are set up in Jobe Hall, inside the auditorium’s side stage area.

While guests visit with digitization specialists, they can also share stories with oral history interviewers set up for the days.

The images and information will become a part of the MS Digital Library, and a copy will be housed within the University Archives & Museum. Individuals may donate their original images to the University Archives & Museum or may take their originals back home after they’ve been scanned.

Guests are also invited to tour the exhibit.

“Hosting the traveling exhibit has provided us the opportunity to reach out to this particular group in our community, and I am thankful for that,” said Emily Jones, university archivist.

Keith Fulcher, executive director of Alumni-Foundation, has been a driving force in making the traveling exhibit and supporting programming a reality.

“People sometimes ask me why we put so much energy and time into collecting a particular piece of our history, and I have to be honest, I am able to dedicate more time to specific projects when there is someone within that community willing to commit their time to helping me collect on their behalf,” said Fulcher.

“Collecting our shared Delta history is a shared responsibility,” added Jones. “With support from groups like the Quality Enhancement Plan, the university’s Diversity Committee and the university’s Special Programs Committee, we are able to shine a spotlight on different areas of our history for a time. Collaborative work such as the traveling exhibit and supporting programming is a key element in encouraging community support and collecting a well-rounded representation of our collective history.”

In order to serve as many individuals as possible during the photo scanning, participants are asked to select 10- 15 images to be scanned. Additional images can be left in the care of the University Archives to continue digitizing and will be returned to each owner once all images have been scanned.

For more information, contact Jones at ejones@deltastate.edu.

Sgt. Curry named Officer of the Year

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Sergeant Tameka Curry was honored this past week by the Exchange Club of Cleveland as part of their annual Emergency Responders Luncheon.

Curry, who has been with Delta State for three years, was recognized as Officer of the Year.

“It feels like a great level of achievement to be recognized,” said Curry. “Over the course of my 12-year career in law enforcement, I’ve been recognized for many things, but I’ve never been named Officer of the Year. I’m thankful I was able to procure that here at Delta State.”

Delta State Police Chief Jeffrey Johns was thrilled with Curry’s recognition.

“She was promoted to sergeant on February 1 based on her experience, contributions and a professional attitude,” said Johns. “Her commitment to service made her a perfect fit for Officer of the Year.”

One responder was selected from each of the following organizations: Bolivar Sheriff’s Department, Cleveland Police and Fire, Delta State University Police Department, Pafford EMS and Bolivar County EOC Volunteers. 

Concert Band and Soldiers’ Chorus of the U.S. Army Field Band coming to BPAC

By | Bologna Performing Arts Center, Community, Uncategorized | No Comments

The Concert Band and Soldiers’ Chorus of the U.S. Army Field Band will perform in concert on April 5 at 7 p.m. at the Bologna Performing Arts bc_capitolstepsCenter at Delta State University.

The event is free and open the public, and advanced free tickets can be claimed at the BPAC Ticket Office, open Monday-Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., by phone at 662-846-4626, or online at www.bolognapac.com.

The event is locally sponsored by the Bolivar Commercial and Delta Magazine.

The Concert Band & Soldiers’ Chorus are the oldest and largest of The U.S. Army Field Band’s performing components. Founded in 1946 and 1957 respectively, these two ensembles combine to present joint concerts on their national tours. They have performed in all 50 states and 30 foreign countries for audiences totaling hundreds of millions.

The 65-member Concert Band and 29-member Soldiers’ Chorus perform regularly in some of the most famous concert halls in the world, and just as often in the humblest auditoriums in the smallest of communities. The joining of these two ensembles allows them to offer unparalleled versatility of programming, ranging from orchestral masterworks and operatic arias to Sousa marches, jazz classics and Broadway musicals.

The band and chorus also perform independently and have recently shared the stage with such ensembles as the Boston Pops, the Cincinnati Pops, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and the National Symphony Orchestra.

In addition to their national tours, formal concerts, chamber recitals, and educational outreach, members of the Concert Band & Soldiers’ Chorus frequently represent the Army at formal and ceremonial functions, including the Presidential Inaugural Parade, presidential funerals, the Army AllAmerican Bowl and diplomatic efforts overseas.

For more information, visit www.bolognapac.com.

Full slate of summer courses available at Delta State

By | Academics, Community, Continuing Education, Faculty/Staff, Students | No Comments

Summer at Delta State University offers a number of opportunities for students to stay on track on their path to graduation.

“Summer school is a great way to get ahead with coursework, catch up on credits, boost your GPA and get pre-requisites out of the way,” said Dr. Christy Riddle, executive director of the Student Success Center at Delta State. “Taking one or two courses each summer may allow you to graduate sooner and start your career earlier — which leads to earning a salary instead of paying college tuition.”

A full list of courses offered during Summer I and Summer II sessions is available online.

Instead of taking a course for four months during the fall or spring semesters, summer school courses are condensed to five weeks. The university offers online and on-campus courses in a variety of subjects that count towards general education requirements or for specific majors. 

“Moving home for the summer? No problem,” said Riddle. “DSU’s online courses allow students to take classes from anywhere in the world.”

Students can also go ahead and register for summer courses during Pre-Registration Week from April 3-7. By meeting with academic advisors, students can register for both summer and fall classes.

Dr. Beverly Moon, dean of Graduate & Continuing Studies and Research at Delta State, added that summer coursework provides many opportunities for high students and community members alike.

“So many courses we offer appeal to the wide community,” said Moon. “Those include HPER courses such as swimming, art courses, the blues curriculum, and many others such as personal finance, the history of rock ‘n’ roll, astronomy, karate, or even a computer course.”  

Another benefit is that those signing up for courses don’t necessarily need to be degree-seeking students.

“Many students take a course or two for continuing education credits, or as a requirement for a job,” added Moon. “Some sign up for credit towards a degree somewhere else, to try a new subject, or just for self-gratification.”