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Upholt paddles “Big River”

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Sleeping under the stars, rising with the sun to the sounds of the Mississippi River, paddling daily in a handcrafted canoe — Boyce Upholt, a graduate student at Delta State University, spent six weeks on the Mighty Mississippi this spring.

Upholt, a candidate for a Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (geography), is documenting the “batture,” the woods between the levee and the river, as a part of his thesis.

He calls this important and little-known landscape the “walled-in wild.”

“In a way it’s the leftovers,” said Upholt. “It’s half domesticated, contained by the levee wall, with concrete lining much of the river’s edge, too. But it’s half wild, too — maybe more than half.”

See the full story and photos: http://www.deltastate.edu/photostories/2017/05/25/upholt-paddles-big-river/

 

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President LaForge speaks to city and county boards

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Delta State University President William N. LaForge gave a campus update to the Bolivar County Board of Supervisors and the Cleveland Board of Aldermen this past week.

The update included topics such as the strong relationship between the university and the city and county, as well as information on enrollment, the university budget, a tuition increase, university programs and initiatives, and measures being put in place to offset more than $2 million in state budget cuts.

LaForge said he is proud of the cooperative nature of the university’s “town-gown relations.”

“We depend on each other,” LaForge said. “Cleveland provides a home for the DSU family, and the university offers Cleveland the benefits of an educational, cultural, intellectual, musical, athletic, and artistic center.”

He added Delta State helps drive the economy of Cleveland and the area.

“Most of our 545 faculty and staff live in Cleveland, pay taxes, buy groceries, clothes, and gasoline, and enjoy the public services, dining, and entertainment Cleveland offers,” he said.

In addition, Delta State students spend as much as $10,000 a year per student for off-campus purchases, including rental housing.

As part of the update, LaForge also explained the status of the university budget and several measures the university has put in place as a result of state budget cuts over the past fiscal year.

One change to offset the narrowing budget is a seven percent tuition increase, amounting to a $441 increase in yearly tuition for students. Even with the increase, Delta State remains a bargain with a tuition total that is higher than only Mississippi University for Women and Mississippi Valley State University among the state’s public universities.

In April, Delta State announced it will be closing the Derrall Foreman Golf Course on June 30, which will amount to an annual savings of nearly $250,000. The course will remain unused until decisions are made regarding the repurposing of the property.

“In these tight budget times, we can no longer afford to operate a woefully underutilized enterprise that really is not in line with our academic mission,” LaForge said. “Unfortunately, the cost is just too much to justify … I would encourage you to withhold judgment and premature concern until we actually focus on a project; for example, issues such as taxation, flooding and drainage, and zoning will all be addressed at the appropriate time.”

In addition, Delta State will cease operating the Coahoma County Higher Education Center in Clarksdale, effective June 30. Coahoma Community College, which utilizes the facility in partnership with Delta State, is working to determine if they can continue to operate the CCHEC for an interim period.

The university has also enacted a hiring and spending freeze, is using some reserve funds, will be shutting down some buildings over the summer to save on utilities, and is moving to a four-day work week over the summer.

Additionally, the university is instituting a five percent fee on designated funds, a subset of the general fund. The fee will be assessed in January each year based on the 12-month average balance of the fund.

Other items include a reduction in the Athletics operation budget, re-budgeting of Capital Projects expenditures, a reduction in the E&G Contingency Budget, and an increase in Foundation support.

LaForge announced Delta State will also boost its efforts for a private funding campaign to secure new resources for student success and enrichment, academic excellence, and cultural and social heritage.

In closing, LaForge pointed to Delta State alumni who hold positions of leadership not only locally but nationally.

“Delta State alumni lead and manage the likes of UPS, Charles Schwab, the Casey Family Foundation, our local schools, our Chamber of Commerce, local churches, numerous local businesses, this university, our county, and this city – and that should be a great source of pride for us all,” he said.

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GRAMMY Museum® to celebrate Blues legend John Lee Hooker

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The GRAMMY Museum®, in conjunction with the John Lee Hooker Estate, Craft Recordings and the Catalog Division of Concord Music Group, will celebrate the centennial of the legendary GRAMMY®-winning bluesman with the opening of a new exhibit titled “John Lee Hooker: King of the Boogie,” on Aug. 22 at GRAMMY Museum Mississippi in Cleveland, Mississippi, Hooker’s home state.

The exhibit will open on what would have been the late blues icon’s 100th birthday and will celebrate Hooker’s lasting legacy through rare recordings, photos and one-of-a-kind artifacts.

The exhibit is part of a year-long celebration of Hooker’s musical legacy that features special releases from Craft Recordings, a conference at Delta State University and special exhibits at the Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi, and the Memphis-based Blues Foundation. The exhibit’s official media partners are Oxford American and Living Blues.

“John Lee Hooker was truly a seminal blues artist. Many of his songs are part of America’s blues music treasury,” saidBob Santelli, blues historian and founding executive director of the GRAMMY Museum. “In addition to impacting blues history, Hooker’s music influenced great rock bands like the Rolling Stones, the Animals, the Yardbirds and ZZ Top. We’re thrilled to honor the King of the Boogie’s legacy and tell the story of his incredible career in his own home state.”

On display at GRAMMY Museum Mississippi throughout the fall of 2017, the exhibit will feature:

  • Rare and never-before-heard recordings from Hooker
  • Instruments such as Hooker’s Gibson ES-335
  • Hooker’s “Best Traditional Blues Album GRAMMY for 1997’s Don’t Look Back,” which was co-produced by Van Morrison and Mike Kappus
  • Rare photos, performance outfits and more

The exhibit will travel to Los Angeles at GRAMMY Museum at L.A. LIVE following its instillation in Mississippi.

“John Lee Hooker is gone but not forgotten. In collaboration with the GRAMMY Museum and our partners, the John Lee Hooker family is pleased and honored to be able to bring to the public the artifacts in this exhibit, donated not just by family but by his very dear friends and associates,” said Diane Roan-Hooker and Zakiya Hooker, daughters of the legendary blues artist. “This centennial is a celebration of John Lee Hooker’s amazing life and his love of the music that he shared with the world.”

To celebrate 100 years of Hooker’s music, Craft Recordings will issue a series of titles throughout 2017, culminating with a centennial CD box set, offering 100 career-spanning hits and rarities, plus previously unreleased material. Concord will also reissue several classic Hooker titles on 180-gram vinyl, as well as digitally, in hi-res and MFiT formats. To kick off the centennial celebrations, the label issued a 16-track collection of songs from the prime of Hooker’s career on its Vee-Jay imprint. “Whiskey & Wimmen: John Lee Hooker’s Finest” was released March 31 on vinyl and CD, offering classic tracks from the ’50s and ’60s, including “Boom Boom” and “Dimples.”

Other organizations celebrating the centennial include the Delta Blues Museum, which will host a special exhibit about Hooker featuring clothing, guitars, recordings and more, opening in July. The celebration will continue through August as the museum celebrates its annual “John Lee Hooker Month.” The Delta Blues Museum Band will perform Hooker’s songs when they open the 30th annual Sunflower River Blues and Gospel Festival on Aug. 11. The festival will run through Aug. 13. More information about celebratory activities at the Delta Blues Museum can be found at www.deltabluesmuseum.org.

Hooker’s 1996 album, “Real Folk Blues,” is being inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame at a ceremony coordinated by The Blues Foundation on May 10 in Memphis. In addition, The Blues Foundation will be opening a new exhibit, “The Rosebud Agency and Mike Kappus: 45+ Years Sharing the Music,” which will include a special display of Hooker artifacts, curated by Mike Kappus, long-time manager for Hooker. The exhibit will open on May 10, in conjunction with the Blues Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, and will run through October 2017.

In addition, the fourth annual International Conference on the Blues at Delta State University is scheduled for Oct. 1-3. With an established record of attracting internationally renowned blues scholars and GRAMMY Award-winning talent, the upcoming conference promises to deliver an extra dose of educational and celebratory flair. In partnership with GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, the conference will commemorate the John Lee Hooker Centennial this year. To stay abreast of developments with the conference, visit www.deltastate.edu/bluesconference/.

About John Lee Hooker:
With a prolific career that spanned over five decades, legendary bluesman John Lee Hooker remains a foundational figure in the development of modern music, having influenced countless artists around the globe with his simple, yet deeply effective style. Known to music fans around the world as the “King of the Boogie,” Hooker endures as one of the true superstars of the blues — the ultimate beholder of cool. His work is widely recognized for its impact on modern music — his simple, yet deeply effective songs transcend borders and languages around the globe.

Born near Clarksdale, Mississippi, on Aug. 22, 1917, to a sharecropping family, Hooker’s earliest musical influence came from his stepfather, William Moore, a blues musician who taught his young stepson to play guitar, and whom Hooker later credited for his unique style on the instrument. By the early ‘40s, Hooker had moved north to Detroit by way of Memphis and Cincinnati.

By day, he was a janitor in the auto factories, but by night, like many other transplants from the rural Delta, he entertained friends and neighbors by playing at house parties. “The Hook” gained fans around town from these shows, including local record store owner Elmer Barbee. Barbee was so impressed by the young musician that he introduced him to Bernard Besman, a producer, record distributor and the owner of Sensation Records.

By 1948, Hooker—now honing his style on an electric guitar, had recorded several songs for Besman, who, in turn, leased the tracks to nationally distributed Modern Records. Among these first recordings was “Boogie Chillun,” (soon after appearing as “Boogie Chillen”) which became a No.1 jukebox hit, selling over one million copies. This success was soon followed by a string of hits, including “I’m in the Mood,” “Crawling Kingsnake” and “Hobo Blues.” Over the next 15 years, Hooker signed to a new label, Vee-Jay Records, and maintained a prolific recording schedule, releasing over 100 songs on the imprint.

When the young bohemian artists of the ‘60s discovered Hooker, among other notable blues originators, he found his career taking on a new direction. With the folk movement in high gear, Hooker returned to his solo, acoustic roots, and was in strong demand to perform at colleges and folk festivals around the country. Across the Atlantic, emerging British bands were idolizing Hooker’s work. Artists like the Rolling Stones, the Animals and the Yardbirds introduced Hooker’s sound to new and eager audiences, whose admiration and influence helped build Hooker up to superstar status. By 1970, Hooker had relocated to California and was busy collaborating on several projects with rock acts. One such collaboration was with rock band Canned Heat, which resulted in 1971’s hit record “Hooker ‘n’ Heat.” The double LP became Hooker’s first charting album.

Throughout the late ‘70s and ‘80s, Hooker toured the United States and Europe steadily. His appearance in the legendary “Blues Brothers” movie resulted in a heightened profile once again. Then, at age 72, Hooker released the biggest album of his career, “The Healer.” The GRAMMY Award-winning 1989 LP featured contemporary artists such as Bonnie Raitt, Carlos Santana, Los Lobos and George Thorogood. “The Healer” was released to critical acclaim and sold over 1 million copies.

In the 1990s Hooker released five studio albums, including “Mr. Lucky,” which once again teamed Hooker with an array of artists; “Boom Boom,” which aimed to introduce new fans to his classic material; the GRAMMY-winning “Chill Out;” and a collaboration with Van Morrison, “Don’t Look Back,” which also garnered two GRAMMYs. Throughout the decade, Hooker’s great body of work and contributions to modern music were being recognized not only by his peers, but also by a younger generation. He became a familiar face in popular culture, with appearances on “The Tonight Show” and “Late Night with David Letterman.”

In 1990, a massive tribute concert took place at New York’s Madison Square Garden, featuring Hooker and an all-star lineup of guest artists. One year later, Hooker was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and in 1997 he was presented with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 2000, shortly before his death, Hooker was recognized with a Recording Academy® Lifetime Achievement Award, and just one week before his passing, ever true to form, the bluesman spent his final Saturday night playing a now-legendary show to a packed house at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa, California.

The Hook continues to live on. His music can regularly be heard in TV shows, commercials and films, and many of his tracks have also found a second life sampled in new songs — by the likes of R&B star Brandy, hip-hop legend Chuck D and French electronic musician St Germain, among many others. Most recently, in 2016 his iconic recording, the 1962 Vee-Jay Records single “Boom Boom,” was inducted into the GRAMMY Hall of Fame.

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Alumni Association seeking nominations for 2017 awards

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The Delta State University National Alumni Association is seeking nominations for the 2017 Alumni Service Awards, Alumni Hall of Fame and Outstanding Alumnus of the Year. The deadline for nominations is May 31. The award recipients will be recognized at the Annual Alumni Awards Gala on November 10 during Homecoming weekend.

The Outstanding Alumnus of the Year award was established to give recognition to an alumnus of Delta State who has made significant contributions to human or institutional programs in which a situation, an institution or a movement has been materially changed for the better because of that individual’s personal participation.

Induction into the Delta State University Alumni Hall of Fame is the highest honor bestowed upon an individual by the Alumni Association. Established in 2007, the Alumni Hall of Fame is extended to alumni and friends who have achieved professional distinction and made significant community service contributions at the local, national and/or international level, and who have thus brought honor and distinction to the university.

The Gladys Castle “Friend of Delta State” Service Award was named for Gladys Castle, a 46-year employee of Delta State who served as the first alumni secretary, and it is presented to recognize outstanding service and contributions to the university by a non-alumnus.

The Kent Wyatt “Young Alumnus” Service Award is named for Dr. Forest Kent Wyatt, president emeritus of 24 years, and recognizes outstanding service and contributions to Delta State by a young alumnus 36 years of age or younger.

The Hugh Ellis Walker Alumni Service Award is named for Hugh Ellis Walker, a 24-year director of the Delta State University Alumni/Foundation, and recognizes outstanding service and contributions to Delta State by an alumnus.

The Legacy Award is presented to someone who has made an institutional change upon the university. The Alumni Chapter of the Year is presented to an alumni chapter that is dedicated to raising scholarship dollars for Delta State students in their area.

The Dr. Henry Outlaw Faculty and Staff Service Award was established in 2014 as a way to recognize former faculty or staff members who have made a significant influence in the life of the university and/or the National Alumni Association.

To nominate a person or a group for an award, and to view past recipients, visit http://www.deltastategiving.org/alumniassociation/alumniawardwinners. Nomination forms can be submitted online or mailed to DSU Box 3104 Cleveland, MS 38733, or emailed to alumni@deltastate.edu.

To stay up to date on the Alumni Association’s activities, follow these social media sites: Facebook (Statesmen Graduates), Twitter (@DSU_Alumni), Tumblr (http://www.dsualumni.tumblr.com), LinkedIn (DSU alumni), Instagram (dsualumni) and You Tube (dsualumni1). Save the date for this year’s Pig Pickin’ (Oct. 6 & 7) and Homecoming (Nov. 10 & 11).