Tag

College of Arts & Sciences Archives - News and Events

Senior Tyler Sullivan will serve as a 2017 Thad Cochran Fellow.

DSU quarterback selected for prestigious Congressional Fellowship

By | Academics, College of Arts and Sciences, Delta Council, President, Students | No Comments

Delta State University Statesmen quarterback Tyler Sullivan was recently selected as a 2017 Congressional Fellow for U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran of Mississippi.

Sullivan, who is a biology premedical science major, will move to Washington D.C. in January and remain there through the spring semester. The program selects one Delta State student each year to serve on Cochran’s staff, with the goal of providing a better understanding of the legislative process.

“I am extremely grateful to be selected for the fellowship,” said Sullivan, a native of Louisville, Mississippi. “It’s hard to actually wrap my mind around the fact that I’ll be moving to D.C. in January to work for such a prestigious senator. The fact that Delta State and the Delta Council have chosen and trust me to be their representative for the fellowship is a very high honor.”

Sullivan said he was excited to learn how the legislative process works, having never previously delved into politics.

“I’m looking forward to the challenge of seeing what I’m made of,” he added. “This is an opportunity to not only get a solid foundation in politics, but also an opportunity that will benefit me no matter what I do in the future. I want to learn what it takes to be a valuable Mississippian like Sen. Cochran is, and how to make tough decisions that will affect many people.”

Delta State has a long-running tradition of sending fellows to Washington, and Delta State President William N. LaForge served as Cochran’s chief of staff during the 1980s.

“I am thrilled that Tyler Sullivan has been chosen to be our Congressional Fellow,” said LaForge. “He is confident, capable and is the perfect candidate for this opportunity. He will be of great value to Sen. Cochran’s office while representing Delta State in grand fashion.

“It is professionally and personally gratifying to me that we continue this wonderful relationship with the senator’s office in cooperation with Delta Council and Staplcotn because of the affiliation with Sen. Cochran going back to my days as his chief of staff. Tyler will have an excellent experience there, and their office will benefit from his outstanding background at Delta State.”

Sullivan, who will graduate in December, is currently applying to medical school. He was recently named a finalist for the 2016 William V. Campbell Trophy, which is presented to the best football scholar-athlete in the country. Sullivan was one of only 12 athletes to make the final list and will travel to New York on Dec. 6 for the awards ceremony.

The fellowship program is funded through Delta State University, the Delta Council and Staplcotn. Additionally, Sullivan will receive a stipend from Cochran’s office.

The Delta Council is an area economic development organization representing the 18 Delta and part-Delta counties of Northwest Mississippi. The organization pioneers efforts to solve common problems and promote the development of the local economy. Founded in 1921, Staplcotn (Staple Cotton Cooperative Association) is the oldest and one of the largest cotton marketing cooperatives in the United States.

Brenton King has been named the 2016 John S. and Jutta Karnstedt Ferretti Fellow.

King receives John S. and Jutta Karnstedt Ferretti Fellowship

By | Academics, College of Arts and Sciences | No Comments

Delta State’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program (MA-LS) is proud to announce the 2016 John S. and Jutta Karnstedt Ferretti Fellow.

This year’s recipient of the Ferretti Fellowship is Brenton King, who earned his bachelor’s degree in Social Science Education from Delta State in 2016. King is a native of Inverness, Mississippi, and a very deserving recipient, according to Dr. Charles Westmoreland, assistant professor of history and coordinator of the MA-LS program.

“Brent King is a terrific young scholar with a great passion for education and a bright future,” said Westmoreland. “We are proud to recognize him as this year’s Ferretti Fellow. “Brent’s commitment to learning makes him a fitting recipient of the fellowship, which goes to an incoming MA-LS student and honors both Mrs. Jutta Ferretti and her husband, John. Nobody embodies a commitment to lifelong education and service better than Mrs. Ferretti. She is a Delta State treasure and her presence, energy and support is a true blessing to the university family. We in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program want to thank her for her dedication to our students.”

The degree program is one of only a few in the South and provides graduate-level, interdisciplinary expertise in literature, history, gender and diversity studies, globalization studies, and the humanities in general.

The fellowship is made possible by a $10,000 gift from Ferretti and her late husband John. Ferretti graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies degree in 2010, becoming the oldest graduate in the history of Delta State at the age of 86.

“Education has always been very important to me and my late husband, John,” said Ferretti, in a previous Delta State release. “Learning in all fields affects the present and future as there is still so much to be discovered that we are not aware of today. Education also opens many doors to the students which impact lives locally, state-wide, nationally and internationally. You cannot help people in this life without being helped yourself.”

For more information about the MA-LS program and the John S. and Jutta Karnstedt Ferretti Fellowship, contact Westmoreland at 662-846-4174, or visit http://www.deltastate.edu/artsandsciences/languages-literature/master-of-arts-in-liberal-studies/.

Dr. Sharon K. Hamilton (right), assistant professor of chemistry, works with Sarah Tierce of the Mississippi School of Mathematics and Science.

Hamilton host MSMS student for summer research

By | Academics, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty/Staff, Students | No Comments

Dr. Sharon K. Hamilton, assistant professor of chemistry, recently coordinated a two-week research experience at Delta State University for Sarah Tierce, a rising senior at the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science in Columbus.

Tierce, a Cleveland native, also worked with Katie Penton, a graduate student in Hamilton’s lab, as they explored the creation of a new degradable nanofiber that can be used in biomedical applications such as drug delivery and wound healing.

Tierce’s experience is part of a renewed effort to reestablish connections between the Delta State University Chemistry and Physics Department and the science faculty at the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science.

“Dr. Elizabeth Morgan, a chemistry teacher at MSMS, and I worked together to make this high school research experience possible,” said Hamilton. “Dr. Morgan helped identify interested and motivated students that would benefit from working in a research lab over the summer. I believe Sarah, a rising senior at MSMS, gained great insight into what research means and how a research lab functions.”

From left: Dr. Sharon Hamilton, Sarah Tierce and Katie Penton.

From left: Dr. Sharon Hamilton, Sarah Tierce and Katie Penton.

Hamilton added that this experience provides a great opportunity for high caliber students to learn about Delta State and its great learning atmosphere on campus and in the department.

“Moreover, this provided a chance for one of my graduate students, Katie Penton, to provide mentorship to a younger student — an invaluable skill in the workforce,” said Hamilton. “I would love to host more high school students in my lab. I believe it gives students a cutting edge when it comes to college applications, and it puts Delta State at the forefront of their mind when applying for colleges their senior year.”

The research is a collaborative effort between Hamilton and Dr. Gisela Buschle-Diller in the Department of Biosystems Engineering at Auburn University. The work is supported by the Mississippi INBRE, funded by an Institutional Development Award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under grant number P20GM103476.

Dr. Joseph Bentley, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Physics at Delta State, was also thrilled to rekindle the relationship with MSMS.

“Our department is very pleased to have a student from MSMS doing research with Dr. Sharon Hamilton this summer,” said Bentley. “Dr. Hamilton is our new organic chemist and is doing exciting polymer research. This collaboration is just one of several efforts reestablishing a connection with MSMS that our department enjoyed previously, in large part thanks to Dr. Henry Outlaw, who was instrumental in maintaining the DSU/MSMS relationship. In the past, faculty from MSMS helped DSU host education workshops for local Delta teachers and this is a tradition the Department of Chemistry and Physics and MSMS look forward to renewing. In the future, we hope to host more MSMS students in research experiences at Delta State.”

Learn more about the department at http://www.deltastate.edu/artsandsciences/chemistry-and-physics.

Students Tyler Sullivan (left) and Tyler Daniels were recently selected to participate in the undergraduate portion of the Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship Program.

Students accepted into Rural Physician Scholarship Program

By | Academics, College of Arts and Sciences, Students | No Comments

Delta State students Tyler Daniels of Oak Grove, and Tyler Sullivan of Louisville, were recently selected to participate in the undergraduate portion of the Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship Program (MRPSP).

Created in 2007, MRPSP identifies college students who demonstrate the necessary commitment and academic achievement to become competent, well-trained, rural primary care physicians in the state of Mississippi.

The program offers undergraduate academic enrichment and a clinical experience in a rural setting. Upon completion of all medical school admissions requirements, participants can be admitted to the University of Mississippi School of Medicine or William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine.

While in medical school, the scholars are under consideration for $30,000 per year based on available funding. Consistent legislative support of MRPSP translates to 60 medical students receiving a total of $1,800,000 to support their education. Additional benefits include personalized mentoring from practicing rural physicians and academic support.

Upon completion of medical training, MRPSP Scholars must enter a residency program in one of five primary care specialties: family medicine, general internal medicine, medicine-pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology or pediatrics. The scholar must also provide four years of service in a clinic-based practice in an approved Mississippi community of 20,000 people or less located more than 20 miles from a medically served area.

MRPSP provides a means for rural Mississippi students to earn a seat in medical school, receive MCAT preparation, earn a $120,000 medical school scholarship, and learn the art of healing from practicing rural physicians.

For more information, contact Dan Coleman, MRPSP associate director, at 601-815-9022, jdcoleman@umc.edu or http://mrpsp.umc.edu.

The 2016 inductees for the Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society include (left to right): Brenton King, Katherine Jackson, Laura Kate Fortner and Matt Riggins. Missing from the photo: are Alexis Danielle Banks, Dylan Garrett, Wesley Rippee and Kaelin Kneeland.

Phi Alpha Theta welcomes new members

By | Academics, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty/Staff, Students | No Comments

The College of Arts and Sciences at Delta State University inducted eight new members to the Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society today.

This year’s inductees included: Alexis Danielle Banks, Laura Kate Fortner, Dylan Garrett, Wesley Rippee, Matthew Riggins, Kaelin Kneeland, Brenton King, and Katherine Jackson.

Dr. Charles Westmoreland, assistant professor of history and Phi Alpha Theta advisor, inducted the new members and award certificates.

Phi Alpha Theta is an American honor society for undergraduate and graduate students and professors of history. The society has over 350,000 members, with about 9,500 new members joining each year through 860 local chapters.

The organization was established on March 17, 1921 at the University of Arkansas by professor Nels Cleven. Cleven had become convinced in his time at the university that a fraternity of scholars (which would accept men or women) was important for the study of history.