Tag

Capps Archives & Museum Archives - Page 3 of 4 - News and Events

Archives welcomes accomplished writer

By | Academics, Archives and Museum, Community, Faculty/Staff, Students | No Comments

Adrienne Berard, writer in residence for Delta State’s Capps Archives & Museum, will present a lecture to the Bolivar County Historical Society at noon August 11 in the Archives’ seminar room. The public is invited to attend this free event.

Berard is an award-winning journalist based in New York City who will spend the fall at Delta State. Her book “Love and War” was voted one of Amazon’s Best Books of the Year for 2014.

She is a graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and Smith College. Her current book project, “When Yellow Was Black: The untold story of the first fight for desegregation in Southern schools,” will be published by Beacon Press in 2015.

Berard is the Archives & Museum’s first writer in residence, where she will focus her efforts on the Mississippi Delta Chinese, and particularly the Gong Lum v. Rice case.

The case is considered the first desegregation case in Mississippi. From the courts in Rosedale, to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1927, the question of access to public education was debated back and forth to allow Martha Lum to continue her education.

“I am incredibly grateful for the chance to explore a forgotten yet vital part of the Delta’s history here at Delta State,” said Berard. “By offering lectures to the public, I hope to shed light on what is normally a very insulated process — the act of writing a book.

“In the coming months, I plan to explore the legacy of Gong Lum while engaging the community in discussions about what it means to be a chronicler of history.”

Berard will be teaching a course this fall, JOU/COM 492, specifically about the Lum case. Students are still able to sign up for the class. poster for jou 492[7]

Delta State Archives has been awarded a Mississippi Humanities grant to support the lecture series and oral history work that Berard will take on this semester.

“The Mississippi Humanities Council offers us the opportunity to examine our mission, prepare a scope of work and then financially support our programs and activities,” said Emily Jones, university archivist. “I am excited to have their support with our first writer in residence and to continue the tradition of collecting oral histories through the Archives.”

Berard will present the following discussions as scheduled:

* Sept. 11 — tales and discoveries from an accidental historian
* Oct. 25 — co-present with Dr. John Jung: field stories, from spoken to written words
* Nov. 13 —making stories from scraps of history: how to use archives for narrative
* Dec. 4 — a reading from Berard’s new book

This program is financially assisted by the Mississippi Legislature through the Mississippi Department of Archives & History and by the Mississippi Humanities Council. Also supporting the program is the Kings Daughter’s & Sons Circle #2 in Greenville.

The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the MHC, National Endowment for the Humanities, the MDAH or the University of Southern Mississippi.

To learn more about Delta State’s Archives & Museum, visit www.deltastate.edu/academics/libraries/university-archives-museum. Follow Archives on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delta-State-University-Archives-Museum/149608545092356.

 

 

Judge’s collection added to archives

By | Archives and Museum | No Comments

A number of campus and community members gathered April 25 to celebrate the portrait unveiling of the late Article III U.S. District Judge W. Allen Pepper Jr. at Kent Wyatt Hall on the campus of Delta State University.

Pepper, who resided in Cleveland and was loved by many in the community, passed away suddenly on Jan. 24, 2012.

Pepper’s wife, Virginia “Ginger” Brown, and son, William Allen Pepper III, retired U.S. Senator from Mississippi Trent Lott and federal judges were in attendance for the special ceremony.

Also announced at the event was the Pepper family donation of the judge’s professional and personal memorabilia to be stored at the Charles W. Capps, Jr. Archives & Museum on Delta State’s campus.

Highlighted items include: birth certificate and baptismal record; manuscript and photographs from Belzoni Elementary through high school years; photographs of family and friends in Belzoni; military records; the University of Mississippi fraternity involvement, baccalaureate and graduation records and photographs; photographs of wedding to Virginia Brown; newspaper clippings announcing law practice; court case decisions; appointment as a federal judge; his mother’s Bible and the Bible from which he taught Sunday School at First United Methodist Church in Cleveland; ski patches from the various ski trips the Pepper family made; posters and notes on the ski competitions Pepper participated in; correspondence between Pepper and fellow lawyers and judges in the district; article manuscript submissions for various publications; framed invitations to U.S. presidential inaugurations (Bush, Clinton and Bush); candid photographs of Pepper with various friends such as Lott and other ranking government officials; commemorative gavels, coffee mugs, plaques and other notable artifacts from Pepper’s philanthropic activities; and full newspapers and clippings related to major accomplishments in Pepper’s career.

Emily Jones, university archivist, was honored to help the Pepper family organize the plethora of items.

“In particular, the Pepper collection represents one of our community’s treasured members,” said Jones. “Within the boxes and folders, mementos and photographs are the stories of lives touches by W. Allen Pepper, Jr. The University Archives and Museum is honored that the Pepper family has donated this collection in our safe keeping.”

The University Archives is home to the following notable political collections: Charles W. Capps Jr.; Walter Sillers Sr. and Jr.; Benjamin Grubb Humphreys; Florence Warfield Sillers; Lucy Somerville Howorth; Representative Hainon Miller; and Charles Clark.

“I know the significance of a collection such as this being added to the archives at Delta State,” said Jones. “We have several collections in house related to politicians and lawyers — but to have a collection of papers from a judge of this caliber is something we are definitely honored to add.”

Pepper, who worked at the U.S. Courthouse in Greenville, was appointed to the position of U.S. District Judge in 1999 by then President Bill Clinton. His portrait will permanently hang at the Greenville courthouse.

While Pepper did not complete his education at Delta State, he was a long time supporter and friend of the university. He was a graduate of The University of Mississippi, where he was a member of the Sigma Nu Fraternity and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1963.

He received his Juris Doctor degree from The University of Mississippi School of Law in 1968 and maintained a solo law practice for 30 years prior to his appointment to the bench.

He also served two years as an officer with the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army.

Along with being an exceptional attorney and judge, Pepper was a dear friend to many in the community and tried to live as an exemplary leader. He served as president of the Lions Club, Crosstie Arts Council and the Bolivar County Ole Miss Alumni Association. Additionally, he was the vice president of the Cleveland-Bolivar County Chamber of Commerce and worked with local Cub Scouts as a scout master, Habitat for Humanity, and a number of other community organizations.

Pepper had long ties with the First United Methodist Church, where he taught Sunday School for 12 years and served as chairman of the Administrative Board, Finance Committee and Pastor Parish Relations Committee.

For more information on the Pepper collection, or Delta State’s Archives & Museum, visit www.deltastate.edu/academics/libraries/university-archives-museum.

 

Portrait honors Judge Pepper

By | Community, President | No Comments

A number of campus and community members gathered today to celebrate the portrait unveiling of the late Article III U.S. District Judge W. Allen Pepper Jr. at Kent Wyatt Hall on the campus of Delta State University.

Pepper, who resided in Cleveland and was loved by many in the community, passed away suddenly on Jan. 24, 2012.

Among the distinguished guests were Pepper’s wife, Virginia “Ginger” Brown, and son, William Allen Pepper III.

William said of his father, “He once said he had the greatest job in the world and he meant it. He talked about the love for every case that came his way.”

Also in attendance was retired U.S. Senator from Mississippi Trent Lott and five Article III U.S. District judges: Chief Judge Michael Mills, Judge Sharion Aycock, Judge Debra Brown, Judge Neal Biggers and Judge Glen Davidson.

Magistrate Judges S. Allan Alexander, David Sanders and Jane Virden also spoke praise of the former leader.

Portrait artist Jason Bouldin, discussed the bright yellow background of his portrait, symbolically representing the positivity that Pepper brought into the lives of others — a way to reflect on life worth celebrating and remembering.

Closing remarks were provided by Ginger, who spoke of all the fond memories shared with Pepper’s former friends, neighbors and colleagues.

Pepper, who worked at the U.S. Courthouse in Greenville, was appointed to the position of U.S. District Judge in 1999 by then President Bill Clinton. His portrait will permanently hang at the Greenville courthouse.

The Pepper family also made the notable announcement of its donated collection of the judge’s professional and personal memorabilia that will be stored at the Charles W. Capps, Jr. Archives & Museum on Delta State’s campus.

Emily Jones, university archivist, helped organize the plethora of photos, letters, documents and framed resolutions included in the compilation.

“I know the significance of a collection such as this being added to the archives at Delta State,” said Jones. “We have several collections in house related to politicians and lawyers — but to have a collection of papers from a judge of this caliber is something we are definitely honored to add.”

While Pepper did not complete his education at Delta State, he was a long time supporter and friend of the university. He was a graduate of The University of Mississippi, where he was a member of the Sigma Nu Fraternity and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1963.

Pepper received his Juris Doctor degree from The University of Mississippi School of Law in 1968 and maintained a solo law practice for 30 years prior to his appointment to the bench.

He also served two years as an officer with the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army.

Along with being an exceptional attorney and judge, Pepper was a dear friend to many in the community and tried to live as an exemplary leader. He served as president of the Lions Club, Crosstie Arts Council and the Bolivar County Ole Miss Alumni Association. Additionally, he was the vice president of the Cleveland-Bolivar County Chamber of Commerce and worked with local Cub Scouts as a scout master, Habitat for Humanity, and a number of other community organizations.

Pepper had long ties with the First United Methodist Church, where he taught Sunday School for 12 years and served as chairman of the Administrative Board, Finance Committee and Pastor Parish Relations Committee.

Civil Rights exhibit comes to archives

By | Archives and Museum, General | No Comments

Delta State University Archives & Museum will be hosting “The Freedom Rides: Journey for Change” traveling exhibit from Feb. 25 through Apr. 14. The display will be held in the main gallery of the Charles W. Capps, Jr. Archives and Museum Building.

According to University Archivist Emily Jones, “The Freedom Rides: Journey for Change” sheds light on one of the most prominent events in Civil Rights history. It embraces the struggles many individuals endured to create a society of equality. The exhibit includes images of the bombing of a Greyhound bus outside of Anniston, Ala., the journey from Montgomery to Jackson, Freedom Riders at the Greyhound bus station in Jackson, Miss., Freedom Riders at the Jackson airport, mug shots, and Freedom Riders going to trial in Jackson.

Many of the images were taken from the original film footage in the WLBT News Film Collection. A DVD of the original footage is included in the exhibit.

The display is part of the Mississippi Department of Archives & History traveling exhibits program. This program includes individuals of different cultural backgrounds journeying through the Deep South attempting to change practices that were legalized by the United States judicial system.

“I am also thrilled to be working with the university’s diversity committee in promoting its upcoming conference,” said Jones. “As with every exhibit we host, I hope that this provides an opportunity for reflection and thought on the impact of the Civil Rights movement in our community.”

“The Freedom Rides: Journey for Change” was sponsored by the following organizations: the MS Department of Archives & History, the Foundation of MS History, MS Humanities Council, MS Historical Records Advisory Board and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

The museum and exhibit are open to faculty, staff, students, researchers and the general public. For more information, visit www.deltastate.edu/academics/libraries/university-archives-museum.

 

Christmas primer donated to archives

By | Archives and Museum | No Comments

Keith Frazier Somerville and her husband made Cleveland their home in 1912 — despite the lack of a library. In the face of literary deprivation, she simply created a library. Local author Linton Weeks estimates that Cleveland’s first kindergarten was held at Somerville’s home just north of Jones Bayou Bridge on South Leflore Avenue.
 
“Somerville’s willpower and sense of conviction paired perfectly with her flair for crafting a story,” said Delta State University Archivist Emily Jones. “‘Christmas in the Primer’ is one example of the balance between Somerville’s love for writing and her resolve to fill a need. With the Christmas season upon us, sharing this curiously delightful piece from the Archives collections seems appropriate.”
 
A primer was a book used for teaching elementary children to read. The Delta State University Archives and Museum received Somerville’s primer as a gift from her granddaughter, Keith Dockery Derbes, who also donated other pieces written by her grandmother. Estimated to have been penned sometime in the 1920s, the book was an essential classroom piece for the teacher.
 
Somerville taught first grade at the Cleveland Consolidated School, which was the largest consolidated school of its kind in the world by 1926, wrote J.W. Parks.

“Christmas in the Primer” begins this way: “Away down South, in the land where the cotton grows, and the biggest consolidated schools in America flourish equally well, Christmas comes with a bang.”
 
Somerville would ensure that her class would glean every bit of knowledge she could impart and would have a cheerful time doing so. Keith Dockery McLean reflected on her mother.
 
“We had a creative and bright mother who dreamed up fascinating things for us to do,” said McLean.
 
There was much enthusiasm from the children as the weeks passed before Christmas. Naturally, the primer and first grade teachers took advantage of this enthusiasm to foster the most important of their subjects, primary reading and word recognition.

One creative way that Somerville taught word recognition was to create a word Christmas tree. In the book, she provides instruction on how to construct the tree and the word cards, as well as a variety of lessons on how the tree can be used for classroom instruction. Not one to simply choose words at random, Somerville consulted Thorndyke’s list of best known words in the English language for her students.
 
“This manuscript was a prized family treasure over the years, but it should also be noted that the photographs taken during those long-ago school days were also preserved,” said Jones. “Demonstrating the Christmas word tree are a few of the students from Somerville’s class. Tokens such as these items share our past with our present.
 
“The Archives & Museum is grateful for the generosity of our donors over the years as we now boast more than 360 collections of manuscripts, photographs, audio recordings, textiles, artwork and other pieces of Delta memorabilia. Thank you for sharing your history with us.”

For more information, visit http://www.deltastate.edu/academics/libraries/university-archives-museum/.