CORE arts

Countdown to CORE Arts camp

By | Bologna Performing Arts Center, Community | No Comments

Only seven spots remain at CORE Arts camp, a two-week residential performing and visual arts camp for youth aged 12-18, held on campus at Delta State University.

CORE Arts Camp, part of the Janice Wyatt Mississippi Summer Arts Institute, is a camp where young and emerging artists take classes in multiple artistic disciplines, all in preparation for final showcases that are free and open to the public.The camp begins June 4, and the last day to apply for admission is May 26.

Classes at CORE Arts 2017 include: contemporary dance, web series production, mixed-media portraiture, class voice, ceramics, audition-preparation workshops, and many more.

Students will have the opportunity to build their own schedules and take classes led by artistic professionals, including several professors from the Delta State University Department of Art. They will visit the recently renovated Wiley Planetarium on campus and take a field trip to Memphis to see a local production of “Aida,” a Tony Award-winning musical. Campus events include scavenger hunts and cookouts, movies shown on the big screen at the Bologna Performing Arts Center, and the camp-wide talent show.

For more information about CORE Arts Camp, contact Cade Holder at the Arts Education Office at 662-846-4844, or visit bolognapac.com. Spots are also available for PLUS Camp, a day camp for 5-11-year-olds that will take place July 17-22.

University installs chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon

By | Academics, College of Arts and Sciences, Students | No Comments
Front row: (left to right): Dr. Chris Jurgenson, Dr. Sharon K. Hamilton (faculty councilor), Zachary Kinler, Katie Penton, Emily Grossi (president), Ana Daisy Camarillo (treasurer), Amber Wilson, JC Blackmon (secretary), Jill Harper, Dr. Gene Grimley, Dr. Gene Grimley ( National PLU President). Back row (l to r): Dr. Joe Bentley (departmental chair), Will Weeks, Dalvin Williams, Kelby Flemons, Tyler Daniels (vice president), Taylor Worsham, Dr. Chuck Smithhart.

 

Delta State University recently installed a new chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon on campus, the Gamma Delta chapter.

The aims and purposes of Phi Lambda Upsilon are the promotion of high scholarship and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied chemistry. The organization was founded as an honorary chemical society in 1899.

The Gamma Delta chapter inducted 11 student charter members and five charter faculty members. A total of 10 undergraduate students were initiated during the ceremony on April 21.

The inductees include: JC Blackmon, of Byhalia; Daisy Camarillo, of Gilcrest, Colorado; Tyler Daniels, of Hattiesburg; Kelby Flemons, of Big Creek; Emily Grossi, of Marks; Zach Kinler, of Picayune; Will Weeks, of Boyle; Dalvin Williams, of Vaiden; Amber Wilson, of French Camp; and Taylor Worsham, of Grenada. Previously inducted to PLU as a member-at-large, Katie Penton, also became a charter member of the DSU Chapter of PLU.

Other charter members included chemistry faculty members Dr. Joe Bentley, Dr. Sharon K. Hamilton, Jill Harper, Dr. Chris Jurgenson, and Dr. Charles Smithhart.

“Establishing the Delta Gamma chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon is a hallmark in the history of the chemistry program at Delta State,” said Hamilton, faculty counselor for the group. “It recognizes the quality of our department and our students. I’m extremely proud of all the work that went in to establishing this chapter, and I am proud of our first group of initiates. Our chemistry students work very hard and I am pleased to have them associated with such a prestigious society that recognizes their achievements.”

Bentley, chair of the Department of Chemistry and Physics at Delta State, was also thrilled to institute PLU on campus.

“Establishing a chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon at Delta State is a terrific opportunity for both students and faculty alike,” he said. “As our students apply to professional schools and graduate schools, or for industrial or education jobs, they will be able to highlight their academic achievements in their major field by listing their membership in PLU on their resume. The Department of Chemistry and Physics is honored to have this chapter at Delta State.”

Phi Lambda Upsilon was the first honor society dedicated to a single scientific discipline. In the span 113 years, it has grown into an organization comprising 73 chapters and more than 60,000 members. Learn more at http://philambdaupsilon.org/.

Erin Newman '17

Newman honored for campus and community contributions

By | Academics, Archives, Athletics, Community, Faculty/Staff, Students | No Comments
Erin Newman ’17

First attracted to Delta State’s swim program, recent graduate Erin Newman began her college career as a quiet freshman, but quickly found her voice through her passion for history.

Her professors are most impressed by her spirited discussions with both upperclassmen and instructors.

“She uses evidence to support logical arguments, proves her point in a quiet but effective manner, and often persuades others to embrace her perspective,” said Dr. Charles Westmoreland, assistant professor of history.

Given her stellar performance in the classroom, Erin has amassed a variety of academic honors at Delta State. Most recently, she was the recipient of the 2017 Jack Winton Gunn Award at this year’s College of Arts and Sciences awards program.

The Gunn Award is given for overall academic excellence in honor of the former dean of the university, and it is among the highest awards presented at Delta State.

Outside the classroom, Newman has also played an important role in preserving the history of Delta State and the surrounding region.

In the summer of 2015, she interned with University Archives and Museum, an experience which allowed her to assist in the development of the DSU 90th Anniversary Exhibit. Additionally, she has been a key contributor to two exhibits on sports history and culture, one of which was a Smithsonian traveling exhibit on display on campus in the fall of 2016.

In 2016, Newman took on extensive responsibilities in historical interpretation and preservation by serving as the program director at the Amzie Moore House Museum and Interpretive Center, a Cleveland historic site that interprets the life and legacy of civil rights leader Amzie Moore. Her work with the museum involved leading group tours and engaging in community outreach programs.

Newman, right, works with James McBride, president of the Bolivar County Board of Supervisors, and Will Hooker, Bolivar County administrator.

Newman, right, works with James McBride, president of the Bolivar County Board of Supervisors, and Will Hooker, Bolivar County administrator.

“Erin has made significant contributions to our mission to expand the legacy of Amzie Moore and the work of the civil rights movement in the Mississippi Delta,” said Will Hooker, Bolivar County administrator.

Emily Jones, university archivist, is grateful for Newman’s contributions to campus and community.

“From the beginning, Erin demonstrated initiative and a desire to learn more about the field of archive and museum studies,” said Jones. ”She has soaked up every opportunity, and now that hard work and drive is taking her down an amazing career path.”

Recently, Newman was accepted into the Museum Studies program at the University of Leicester in England, where she has been awarded a President’s Post-Graduate Scholarship for International Students.

To complement her formidable academic talents and community service, she has been a valued member of the Delta State swim team. She has served in a leadership capacity as the vice-chair of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee for the Gulf South Conference.

“Both inside and beyond the classroom, she has helped peers and younger colleagues as they seek to balance the challenges of academics and athletic competition,” added Jones. “Despite practicing several hours a day for the past four years, Erin has been one of the most accomplished students on this campus. She is a model scholar and campus citizen who has taken a vested interested in serving Cleveland and the entire region.”

Follow news of student success at Delta State at www.deltastate.edu.

heritage_area_meeting_02

National Heritage Areas of Mississippi host Collaboration Clinic

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Collaboration Clinic participants from Mississippi and across the country engage in a team visioning exercise at the Biloxi Visitors Center.

 

Three National Heritage Areas – Mississippi Delta, Mississippi Hills and Mississippi Gulf Coast – held a Collaboration Clinic recently at the Biloxi Visitors Center. The workshop was facilitated by the National Park Service’s Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program.

“Collaboration Clinics are a proposed model for helping NPS staff, stakeholders and partners develop more effective skills for collaboration,” said Elizabeth Smith-Incer, Mississippi Field Office director for the Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance Program. “Planners, superintendents and other decision makers need this kind of training to engage communities as we make decisions about the resources we preserve and protect.”

This is the first Collaboration Clinic held in the Southeast region and the first hosted by a group of National Heritage Areas. Since 2014, the clinics have been offered over a dozen times in parks and sites across the country, including New York City, Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada, New Bedford Whaling National Historic Park in Massachusetts and Zion National Park in Utah.

“We were honored to host this first clinic,” said Rhonda Price, executive director of the Mississippi Gulf Coast NHA. “I think collaboration and partnerships are keys to a successful NHA. We are excited to start working together on joint projects like the NPS/NHA passport program.”

Staff and board members from the three NHAs attended along with representatives from Visit Mississippi and the Department of Archives & History in Jackson. Out-of-state attendees included representatives from the Alliance of National Heritage Areas, the National Parks Conservation Association, and the NPS Office of Partnerships & Philanthropic Stewardship based in Washington, D.C.

“In order for National Heritage Areas to thrive, collaboration is vital,” said Mary Cates Williams, executive director of Mississippi Hills National Heritage Area. “I was very thankful to the National park Service’s Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program for facilitating this workshop and allowing Mississippi’s three NHAs to discuss ways to expand and grow our programs. I can speak for all of us when I say that we are grateful to have the support of not only the National Park Service but our Mississippi congressional delegation as well.”

Collaboration Clinic participants learn about bird tourism at the Pascagoula River Audubon Center.

Collaboration Clinic participants learn about bird tourism at the Pascagoula River Audubon Center.

The workshop included discussions and exercises on a range of topics, including achieving results through collaboration, improving communication and managing conflict.

The group also heard presentations from Dr. Rolando Herts and Lee Aylward of The Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University, which serves as the management entity for the Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area. The presentations were about the passport program and the Delta Jewels Oral History Partnership.

“We discussed developing a statewide Passport to Your National Parks map and other cooperative marketing strategies to promote tourism to our areas,” said Herts. “We also learned about bird tourism partnership opportunities at the Pascagoula River Audubon Center in Moss Point. This was a very productive workshop that will help all of us work together to better serve Delta, Hills and Gulf Coast residents and visitors.”

Learn more about the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at http://www.deltastate.edu/academics/delta-center-for-culture-and-learning.

The Okra Patch

Okra Patch participants mentor Cleveland students

By | Okra Patch, Students | No Comments

The Okra Patch, under the direction of Vice President for Student Affairs Dr. Vernell Bennett, continues its efforts to bridge relationships with Delta State students and Cleveland School District students.

The Okra Patch is guided by several key components, including: increased student engagement, community service/regional stewardship, and mentorship within the Cleveland schools, known as Okra Patch Cleveland Public Schools.

During the spring of 2017, 55 students volunteered for hundreds of hours in Cleveland’s public schools.

“It’s important to invest in and support the community that provides so much support to Delta State,” said Bennett. “It’s also important to make students aware of the significance of service and having a social conscience. Okra Patch Cleveland Public Schools is a wonderful way to create pipelines for recruitment while performing community outreach. The response from Cleveland schools has been overwhelmingly positive.”

After wrapping up its first year in the district, five Okra Patch participants from Delta State were recognized for their mentorship at schools. The Volunteer of the Year honorees were:

– East Side High School: Johnna Ladd and Octavia Kirkland
– D.M. Smith Middle School: Alandria Ramsey
– Pearman Elementary: Anna Mammedova and Nicholas Proctor

“This was a very positive experience for both our students and those in the public school system,” added Bennett.

Okra Patch members are also required to participate in all of the organization’s community service projects. Projects for the spring included partnering with Bolivar County Disaster Relief to assist in the rebuilding and repairing of flood damaged homes in Bolivar County and a beautification project with the Cleveland Park Commission.

Next semester, the Okra Patch will be working with Habitat for Humanity.

To join the Okra Patch, and for more information, visit http://www.deltastate.edu/student-life/okra-patch.