RESSON ranked top nursing school in Mississippi

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In a new ranking from RNtoBSNOnlineProgram.com, Delta State University’s Robert E. Smith School of Nursing came in as the No. 1 nursing school in the state of Mississippi.

To view the rankings of Mississippi nursing schools, visit https://www.rntobsnonlineprogram.com/best-nursing-schools-in-mississippi/.

Dr. Vicki Bingham, dean of RESSON, was thrilled with the top ranking.

“We are very excited to earn this No. 1 ranking among all the nursing schools in the state,” she said. “This recognition by an external source is vital, and it validates our commitment and efforts in providing a high quality education to students who enter our nursing programs.”

Bingham added that RESSON faculty and staff are work diligently to ensure Delta State nursing students are safe and competent health care providers upon graduation.

“We care about the success of our nursing students,” said Bingham. “Students are provided a variety of learning opportunities in the classroom, online, and in clinical experiences to facilitate knowledge and skill acquisition. We provide a high quality education at an affordable cost.”

RNtoBSNOnlineProgram.com is a site dedicated to connecting nurses with the degree programs they’re looking for. For those pursuing an RN to BSN online, the site has a database full of ranked institutions. The organization strives to feature the best RN to BSN programs from across the country. Learn more at RNtoBSNOnlineProgram.com.

Learn more about RESSON’s programming at http://www.deltastate.edu/school-of-nursing.

“B-The Underwater Bubble Show” to wow BPAC

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 Don’t miss “B-The Underwater Bubble Show” at the Bologna Performing Arts Center Nov. 16 at 7 p.m.

Following your dreams and allowing your inner child to take over for a while is the premise of “B-The Underwater Bubble Show,” performing at the Bologna Performing Arts Center on the campus of Delta State University Nov. 16 at 7 p.m.

Inspired by childhood classics like “Alice in Wonderland,” “The Little Mermaid,” and “Peter Pan,” “B-The Underwater Bubble Show” is a modern day fairy tale with one major twist.

“Each classic tale represents a journey of a kid who grows up and learns something,” said co-creator and director Enrico Pezzoli. “We wanted a story about an adult character who discovers that he can still go back and enjoy life. We don’t always need to grow up. Sometimes we need to step backwards for a bit and restart.”

The story follows Mr. B, a creature of modern habits who always feels pressured by a thousand things to do in a world that seems to be moving too fast. The office worker discovers a little aquarium that appears like magic inside his briefcase and gradually becomes enchanted by the wondrous underwater world of Bubblelandia.

“Mr. B represents each of us,” Pezzoli notes. “His transformation is a journey which each of us could take.”

Taking cues from Cirque du Soleil, the visually spectacular show incorporates the latest in stage technology. Lasers, low-ground smoke, and flying foam simulate waves and the underwater atmosphere. A juggler in a huge plastic ball is the performer that immediately attracts Mr. B and the audience into Bubbleandia’s wondrous world, while dancers and acrobats serve as small colorful fish chasing Mr. B and each other inside the aquarium. The biggest attraction of the show is the spectacular use of soap bubbles in multiple artistic ways.

“The biggest challenge was to make everyone understand that the show is for everyone. Many people relate it to kids, but everyone loves bubbles. After performing in so many countries around the world, we have seen adults enjoying the show as much as kids, sometimes with even bigger reactions,” said Pezzoli.

Tickets to see the “B- The Underwater Bubble Show” are $15-$20, and discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. Tickets are on sale now at www.bolognapac.com or at the BPAC Ticket Office at 662-846-4626.

 

Attacca Quartet coming to BPAC

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One of the most internationally acclaimed quartet ensembles, Attacca Quartet, will take the stage of the Bologna Performing Arts Center’s Recital Hall Nov. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

The performance is part of the new Recital Hall series, featuring classical music in an intimate setting in the BPAC’s 145-seat recital hall.

From sold-out concerts at Carnegie Hall and Radio City Musical Hall to National Public Radio’s far-reaching “Tiny Desk” concerts, the Attacca Quartet celebrates the timeless beauty of the string quartet for a broad audience and this sublime art form.

Praised by The Strad for possessing “maturity beyond its members’ years,” the group was formed at the Juilliard School in 2003 and made their professional debut in 2007 as part of the Artists International Winners Series in Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall.

From 2011-2013 they served as the Juilliard Graduate Resident String Quartet, and for the 2014-15 season, they were selected as the Quartet in Residence by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

As stated by The Washington Post, “Mastery like this is scarce enough in quartets that have played together for decades.”

The group has engaged in extensive educational and community outreach projects, serving as guest artists and teaching fellows at the Lincoln Center Institute, the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, and the Woodlands ChamberFest in Texas.

During their time in Cleveland, Attacca Quartet will give a mini-performance at a local assisted living facility in addition to providing a masterclass for Delta State University’s Department of Music students.

Tickets to see Attacca Quartet are $35, and discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. Tickets are on sale now at www.bolognapac.com or at the BPAC Ticket Office at 662-846-4626.

Higher education proves to be excellent investment

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By Glenn Boyce, Commissioner of Higher Education

In the first half of the 20th century, there were many good jobs available to Americans who held only a high school diploma. These jobs provided stability and an income that, though not lavish, was sufficient to provide for a family who lived modestly and saved prudently. After World War II, a shift began to take place and this shift has only accelerated in the 21st century.

The rate of change in the way businesses communicate, sell, distribute and provide goods and services is incredible. Automation impacts everything from assembly lines to distribution facilities and even our own homes. Innovation and adaptability are essential for businesses and also for the individuals in the workforce. As our economy continues to become more technologically advanced, our workforce must have more credentials of value if we, as a state or a nation, will be able to compete in the global economy in which we now live and work.

Two reports from Georgetown University’s Center for Education and the Workforce underscore the importance of earning a bachelor’s degree, both in terms of job availability and earnings potential.

In its report, Recovery: Job Growth and Education Requirements through 2020, the Center estimates that 65 percent of all jobs in the economy will require postsecondary education and training beyond high school by 2020.

Those who invest in themselves by completing a bachelor’s or advanced degree will reap the benefits for the rest of their lives. The Center’s Report, The College Payoff: Education, Occupations, Lifetime Earnings, finds that earning a Bachelor’s degree makes a significant difference in lifetime earnings. Nationally, the median annual income of those with a bachelor’s degree is $56,700, which equates to earning $2.3 million over a lifetime. When looking at lifetime earnings, bachelor’s degree holders earn 31 percent more than workers with an Associates degree and 74 percent more than those with just a high school diploma.

We all know Mississippi falls at the lower end when ranking states by median household income, but having a degree makes as much difference here as in other states. Census data shows that the median household income in Mississippi for a high school graduate is $25,954. The median household income in Mississippi for a college graduate is $40,952.

All 25 of the highest paying jobs in Mississippi require a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Holding a bachelor’s degree also brings stability in an uncertain job market. Unemployment rates for those with at least a bachelor’s degree are much lower than those with only a high school diploma and substantially lower than those who do not have a high school diploma.

Higher education is an investment that opens doors of opportunity for our citizens and enables our state to advance. Having more Mississippians with a bachelor’s degree makes our state more competitive.

Approximately 20 percent of Mississippians hold a bachelor’s degree or higher today, but we continue to improve this number. We have had an increase of 8.9 percent in the number of degrees conferred in the last five years, awarding 17,760 degrees, a record number, in 2017. While steady progress is good, we must raise attainment rates exponentially if we are to advance the state and grow Mississippi’s economy.

When Mississippians invest in themselves through higher education, they increase their own economic prosperity, which, in turn, increases the economic prosperity of the state. We all rise together.

Study in Jamaica this summer

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The Delta State University Department of Art is offering a unique inaugural two-week study abroad opportunity in Jamaica open to all majors and community members.

The three-credit course, “ART492 03, Special Topics in Art,” will take place May 20-June 2, 2018.

Dr. Phyllis Hill, assistant professor of art at Delta State, will be hosting an information session about the trip Nov. 8 at 5 p.m. in Holcombe Norwood Hall, room 151.

“The focus of this trip is service learning and community based research,” said Hill. “This is a unique opportunity for two weeks of cultural emersion and engagement with local experts employed in the Jamaican education, historical and cultural sectors. Students will participate in a service learning project with a local educational institution, conduct historical and cultural research using diverse media such as film, painting, photography and sculpture — and share their findings via an exhibition upon return to DSU.”

The trip will primarily take place in the cities of Kingston and Montego Bay. Programming will also include historical tours, lectures, cultural events, local cuisine, music and cultural experiences.

“Study abroad provides a unique opportunity for DSU students to develop as global citizens in their chosen fields,” added Hill. “However, the majority of our students have not travelled outside of the U.S. The reality is that we exist in a globalized world, and those who are most successful are the graduates who have international experience, cross-cultural communication skills and the ability to discuss cultural issues from multiple informed perspectives. Study abroad makes our students more career-ready and competitive on a global scale, in that they are internationally savvy, adaptable within culturally diverse environments and are able to communicate with varying populations.”

The total cost for the trip and tuition is $3,243 per person, which covers round-trip airfare, lodging, in-country transportation, excursions and travel insurance.

“Jamaica is more than ‘sand, sea and sun.’ It’s a unique blend of people, cultural practices and beliefs,” said Hill. “It offers a wealth of opportunities for historical, cultural and educational collaborations.”

For more information about the trip, contact hill at phill@deltastate.edu.