DMI to offer Pro Tools training

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The Delta Music Institute’s entertainment industry program at Delta State University will offer two weekends of professional instruction and certification in Pro Tools, the recording industry standard for audio recording software.

The workshops, which are open to all interested parties, are scheduled for Jan. 13-15 and Jan. 20-21, 2018 and will be held in Studio B at the DMI on the campus of Delta State. Seating is limited to 10 registrants.

As the sole AVID Learning Partner in the state of Mississippi, Delta State’s DMI program is credentialed to offer training and professional certification in audio production, recording, mixing and related multimedia training.

The Pro Tools training sessions will be offered in two separate courses over two weekends with a daily schedule from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Pro Tools Fundamentals I (PT101) course introduces fundamental Pro Tools concepts and principles during a three-day workshop at a cost of $650. The Pro Tools Fundamentals II (PT110) course, covered during a two-day workshop, expands upon the basic principles taught in the PT101 course and introduces the core concepts and techniques needed to competently operate a Pro Tools system running mid-sized recording sessions. The cost for Pro PT 110 is $550. Together with PT 101, PT 110 provides the training required to prepare for the Avid Certified User certification exam. If the two courses are taken together, the registration fee is $950 for both classes. Discount pricing is available for students.

The workshops at the DMI will be taught by Travis Calvin, instructor in entertainment industry studies at Delta State. Calvin teaches multiple audio courses in the DMI program and is an AVID Certified Instructor.

Avid certification helps professionals attain and demonstrate the skills and credentials they need to increase their value, competency and efficiency in the highly competitive media industry.

For more information about the workshops or to register, call 662-846-4579 or email

The Delta Music Institute is an independent center of study under the College of Arts and Sciences at Delta State University, offering a bachelors degree in entertainment industry studies. The focus of the DMI is to provide students with a broad and thorough education in the technological, creative and business areas of the music and entertainment industry. For information, contact 662-846-4579 or visit

Delta State University Herbarium pays tribute to Dr. Henry J. Jacob

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Delta State University has announced a new display that honors the scientific contributions of Dr. Henry J. Jacob, former dean of education, who collected more than 2,000 plant specimens for the Delta State University Herbarium during the late 1940s to mid 1970s.

The specimens he collected are from many parts of Mississippi including Bolivar, Harrison, Oktibbeha and Tishomingo counties. Beyond state lines, Jacobs also collected plants from Alabama, Louisiana, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and more. Plant specimens include basal angiosperms; monocots (orchids, grasses, sedges), ferns; eudicots (legumes, mints, yarrows, hickories, and hawthornes) and lichens.

Many of the specimens he collected remained in the newspapers he used on upon collecting; often these newspapers only contained the date and location. The majority of Jacob’s specimens were ignored until Dr. Nina Baghai-Riding and some Delta State students discovered their importance and started work on them.

Countless numbers of laboratory hours have been dedicated to mounting them on herbarium paper, identifying them, and updating information so that they could be digitized and incorporated  into herbarium databases including SERNEC – Southeast Regional Network of Expertise and Collections ( as well as the Delta State University Herbarium website (

Dr. Mac Alford, botanist at the University of Southern Mississippi, has helped Baghai-Riding identify many of Jacob’s specimens. Many of Jacob’s specimens are being used in constructing a Plant Atlas on Mississippi Plants that will possess more than 8,000 species. According to Alford, some of the species that Dr. Jacob collected from the Mississippi Gulf Coast are rare or endangered.

The display, designed by University Archivist Emily Jones, honors Jacob’s scientific contribution to the Delta State University Herbarium.  The display is located by the Jacob Conference Center in Ewing. The display will be up through Dec. 15. Contact Baghai-Riding at for more information about the Delta State University Herbarium and environmental science program.

Flight Team places second at Region IV Safecon Flight Team Competition

By | Academics, Aviation, College of Business and Aviation, Students | No Comments
Members of the Delta State University Precision Flight Team, from left to right: Matthew Hill, Brandon Baioni (team advisor), Ryan Hudson, Emma Jeffries (captain), Adam Holthouser (co-captain), Tristan Crockett and Parker Tomlinson.

The Delta State University Precision Flight Team recently took home second place honors at the Region IV Safecon Flight Team Competition in Waco, Texas, from Oct. 30-Nov. 3.

Delta State’s team was second in flying events and tied with Texas State Technical College for second in ground events. This resulted in the team receiving second overall and an invitation to the National Competition at Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana, in May of 2018. The results are the best finish for the team in recent years.

Delta State also received the Red Baron Team Sportsmanship Award and the Competition Safety Award.

The competition focuses on quality, exact and accurate flying. Teams are graded on a number of skills, including a navigation event, short-field landing event, power off landing event, computer accuracy, pre-flight inspection event, and more.

“I am proud of this team because they faced many challenges over the past two years preparing for competition,” said Brandon Baioni, flight team advisor. “The team showed how a little extra effort pays off in the end. The aviation program offers many tools pilots need to be successful in their careers, but I believe that flight team puts these individuals above the others offering them even more tools.”

The current student roster includes Emma Jeffries, Adam Holthouser, Ryan Hudson, Melvin Tucker, Parker Tomlinson, Tristan Crockett, and Matthew Hill.

“It’s a great feeling to know our team was able to work hard, stay focused and were able to pull out second place,” said Jeffries, team captain.” The flight team offers me a chance to fly, work and socialize with my aviation peers. It’s also a great opportunity to make connections outside of DSU as well.”

Delta State has been competing at the Region IV Safecon Flight Team Competition since 1982.

“I think that through the hard work of preparing the team for competition and the team member’s hard work and efforts, the once quieted Delta State University Precision Flight Team has once again regained a voice,” added Baioni.

Learn more about opportunities through Delta State’s Department of Commercial Aviation at

Higher education proves to be excellent investment

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By Glenn Boyce, Commissioner of Higher Education

In the first half of the 20th century, there were many good jobs available to Americans who held only a high school diploma. These jobs provided stability and an income that, though not lavish, was sufficient to provide for a family who lived modestly and saved prudently. After World War II, a shift began to take place and this shift has only accelerated in the 21st century.

The rate of change in the way businesses communicate, sell, distribute and provide goods and services is incredible. Automation impacts everything from assembly lines to distribution facilities and even our own homes. Innovation and adaptability are essential for businesses and also for the individuals in the workforce. As our economy continues to become more technologically advanced, our workforce must have more credentials of value if we, as a state or a nation, will be able to compete in the global economy in which we now live and work.

Two reports from Georgetown University’s Center for Education and the Workforce underscore the importance of earning a bachelor’s degree, both in terms of job availability and earnings potential.

In its report, Recovery: Job Growth and Education Requirements through 2020, the Center estimates that 65 percent of all jobs in the economy will require postsecondary education and training beyond high school by 2020.

Those who invest in themselves by completing a bachelor’s or advanced degree will reap the benefits for the rest of their lives. The Center’s Report, The College Payoff: Education, Occupations, Lifetime Earnings, finds that earning a Bachelor’s degree makes a significant difference in lifetime earnings. Nationally, the median annual income of those with a bachelor’s degree is $56,700, which equates to earning $2.3 million over a lifetime. When looking at lifetime earnings, bachelor’s degree holders earn 31 percent more than workers with an Associates degree and 74 percent more than those with just a high school diploma.

We all know Mississippi falls at the lower end when ranking states by median household income, but having a degree makes as much difference here as in other states. Census data shows that the median household income in Mississippi for a high school graduate is $25,954. The median household income in Mississippi for a college graduate is $40,952.

All 25 of the highest paying jobs in Mississippi require a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Holding a bachelor’s degree also brings stability in an uncertain job market. Unemployment rates for those with at least a bachelor’s degree are much lower than those with only a high school diploma and substantially lower than those who do not have a high school diploma.

Higher education is an investment that opens doors of opportunity for our citizens and enables our state to advance. Having more Mississippians with a bachelor’s degree makes our state more competitive.

Approximately 20 percent of Mississippians hold a bachelor’s degree or higher today, but we continue to improve this number. We have had an increase of 8.9 percent in the number of degrees conferred in the last five years, awarding 17,760 degrees, a record number, in 2017. While steady progress is good, we must raise attainment rates exponentially if we are to advance the state and grow Mississippi’s economy.

When Mississippians invest in themselves through higher education, they increase their own economic prosperity, which, in turn, increases the economic prosperity of the state. We all rise together.

COEHS to host annual Kent Wyatt Distinguished Lecture

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The College of Education and Human Sciences will host the fourth annual Kent Wyatt Distinguished Lecture at Delta State University on Nov. 6 at noon in the Jacob Conference Center.

This year’s guest lecturer will be Dr. Renée A. Middleton, dean of The Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education at Ohio University.

Middleton is a distinguished educator with a strong commitment to transforming teaching and learning in schools. She has spent her career ensuring equity and excellence in education (P-20) and is a tireless advocate for ensuring that every student in America has the chance to learn and grow under teachers whose knowledge and skills have been verified through a peer-reviewed, performance-based process.

Dr. Leslie Griffin, dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences at Delta State, is thrilled to host Middleton as the keynote speaker.

“Dr. Middleton’s dedication to partnering with schools to ensure that teachers are fully prepared to assume their roles in the schools they will serve is well-regarded in the broad educational community,” said Griffin. “As faculty in the College of Education and Human Sciences reach out to local schools to understand how to better serve them through the preparation of quality teachers, leaders, and other school professionals, Dr. Middleton’s sharing of her experiences provides guidance. We look forward to learning from her through this lecture.”

Middleton serves on the board of directors of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, a nonprofit organization dedicated to elevating the voice of accomplished teachers in shaping a true profession and raising student achievement. She also serves on numerous other boards, including the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, and the Coalition of Rural and Appalachian Schools.

She has 21 years of experience with consulting, working with issues like public school strategic planning for diversity and rehabilitation counseling and multicultural diversity, within the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Food & Drug Administration: Center for Devices and Radiological Health and the Alabama Board of Examiners in Counseling working on Ethics/Consumer Protection.

Middleton received her bachelor’s degree in speech and hearing with a minor in behavioral sciences from Andrews University in 1981. She received her master’s degree in clinical audiology with a minor in speech pathology and behavioral sciences from the University of Tennessee in 1983. Middleton received her doctoral degree from Auburn University in 1990, with a focus on rehabilitation administration and a minor in rehabilitation counseling and education.