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Graduate Geospatial Information Technologies Course Descriptions


 


Geospatial Information Technologies



















































































































































Course Name


Course  Number


Delivery


Pre-requisite


Description


Introduction to Geospatial Science and GIS (GIS I)


GIS
500


Ground


MAT 104 (Algebra) and 105 (Trigonometry) or equivalents


This course provides students with an introduction to the theory and practice of spatial science.  Fundamental concepts include geodesy, coordinate systems and projections, basic computer science, GPS, GIS, and remote sensing.  Student will gain basic competency in the use of GIS, GPS, remote sensing hardware and software packages and learn to apply the scientific method in coordination with these skills to solve problems/answer questions.  This course will meet for 3 credit hours of lecture and 1 credit hour (3 hours of contact time) of lab each week.  The grad student section will have an additional research component.


Introduction to Geospatial Science and GIS (GIS I)


GIS
501


Online


MAT 104 (Algebra) and 105 (Trigonometry) or equivalents


An introduction to the integration of the foundational components of geo-spatial information science and technology into a geographic information system (GIS).  The components are the fundamentals of geodesy, GPS, cartographic design and presentation, image interpretation, and spatial statistics/analysis.


Advanced GIS (GIS II)


GIS
510


Ground


GIS 200 or 201 (Intro GIS) or equivalent


Students will gain advanced concepts about GIS techniques and the underlying spatial data structures used by geographic information systems (GIS).  Introductory materials for this course will stress conceptual and practical understanding of computer science as it applies two topical areas: raster vs. vector data formats and single-user vs multi-user GIS environments.  This knowledge will support subsequent instruction in advanced spatial analysis and manipulation techniques.  Student understanding of theory will be pressed into action through a series of practical assignments that emphasize both concepts and technical skills required to manipulate and analyze spatial datasets.  The grad student section will have an additional research component


Digital Image Processing II


GIS
511


Online


GIS 211 (Dig Im Proc I), GIS 221 (Air Photo Interp) or equivalents


Advances in science and technology in aerial and satellite image processing and pattern recognition are presented. Principals and applications address real-world situations and problems.   Topics include: Advanced Classification – Object-oriented image analysis; Classification – Spectral, Spatial, Contextual; Orthorectification (terrain)- Aerial -Film, Digital – Satellite, Medium resolution, High resolution; Hyper spectral Data Processing -Display, Information Extraction; Advanced Methods and Models for Atmospheric Correction; Change Detection – Advanced methods, Accuracy assessment; Advanced Spatial Filtering- Spatial domain, Frequency domain (e.g., Fourier, wavelets); Wavelet Applications Image data fusion, Image data compression; Empirical Modeling of Biophysical Parameters (e.g., spatial and non-spatial regression).


GIS and Community


GIS
520


Ground


GIS 200 or 201 (GIS I) or equivalent


This course focuses on the utilization of Geographic Information Systems for resolving socio-economic issues, with a focus on public involvement and participation. Students are expected to gain an understanding about the use of GIS and allied technologies in resolving issues in governance, healthcare, crime, and resource management through public participation case studies and practical exercises.  The student will acquire skills in using both tabular and spatial data for problem analysis within a GIS platform, with the latest version of ESRI ArcGIS (9.0) software.  The grad student section will have an additional research component


Spatial solutions to natural resources issues 


GIS
530


Ground


GIS 200 or 201 (GIS I) or equivalent


This course focuses on the utilization of Geographic Information Systems and remote sensing for resolving issues in natural resource through a management approach. Students are expected to gain an understanding about the use of GIS and allied technologies in resolving issues involving oil and gas, mining, forestry, air, water and land pollution, planning, diversity and conservation through case studies and practical exercises.  The student will acquire skills in using both tabular and spatial data for problem analysis within a GIS platform, with the latest version of ESRI ArcGIS (9.0) software.    The grad student section will have an additional research component


Photogrammetry II


GIS
531


Online


MAT 442 (Linear algebra) or 3D Vector and Matrix Algebra, Statistics (as equivalency),  GIS 231 (Photogrammetry I) or equivalents


Advanced photogrammetric systems for production of highly accurate digital map products and three-dimensional representations for use and modeling, for example, in GIS environments.  Demonstrates how to use a complex mathematical photogrammetric framework to implement  practical applications.  The application of  photogrammetric principles to real mapping problems.  Analytical and softcopy photogrammetry as well a practical introduction to  commercial photogrammetry.


Artificial Intelligence and Geoprocessing


GIS
541


Online


GIS 200 or 201 (GIS I), GIS 211 (Intro Dig Image Proc), MAT 104 (Algebra) or equivalents


The artificial intelligence theory, principles and applications specific to geospatial processing and analysis in the fields of both remote sensing and geographic information systems.   Topics include:  Expert Systems;  Semantic Networks;  Neural Networks; Genetic Algorithms; Fuzzy Logic;  Dempster-Shafer Theory; Geospatial Data Fusion; AI-guided Image Segmentation;  Image Classification; Geospatial Decision Support Systems.  Case studies  serve to illustrate real world applications of the theory and principles of AI to geospatial problems. The application of AI software tools to remote sensing and GIS data. 


Business Geographics


GIS
551


Online


GIS 221 (Aerial Photo Interp), GIS 361 (Geo Data Syn and Modeling) or equivalents


Key concepts in the field of business geographics including motivation for using geospatial technology in business applications, the different geographic data sets available for use by business analysts, and modeling of spatial data for business applications.  The use of actual GIS software in the context of business geographic applications, the basic theory behind the techniques,  practical skills using hands-on applications are provided


Geospatial Mathematics, Algorithms and Statistics


GIS
561


Online


GIS 200 or 201 (GIS I), GIS 361 (Geospatial Data Syn & Modeling), MAT 441 (Introductory & Multivariate Stats); REM 310 or 311 (Remote Sensing) or equivalents


This is a geostatistics and geomathematics course, presenting the underlying principles and theory of GIS operations (raster, vector or other data models), such as surface analysis, interpolation, network analysis, path optimization, topology, etc.  Topics include:  Nature of Grid-based Mapped Data; Fundamental Spatial Analysis Procedures; Basic Concepts and Procedures in GIS Modeling; Basic Concepts and Procedures in Surface Modeling, Basic Concepts in Spatial Data Mining Future Directions.


Programming GIS with Visual Basic and Python


GIS
570


Ground


GIS 300 (GIS II) or equivalent


This course is intended as an in-depth look at the programming within Geographic Information Systems. The focus will be on GIS programming and methodology, utilizing practical GIS software skills and basic scientific computing skills. A laboratory component to the course will utilize ArcGIS, ArcObjects, and Visual Basic to demonstrate the concepts presented in lecture.


GIS for the Internet and Spatial Databases


GIS
580


Ground


GIS 300 (GIS II) or equivalent


The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how Internet GIS and spatial databases work and to help them develop the skills requisite for success in this field.


GIS Capstone


GIS
590


Ground


GIS 300 (GIS II) or equivalent


The success of cooperative educational institutions that partner with industry and government for the training of future employees and the transfer of technology is well demonstrated by institutions such as the Rochester Institute of Technology, CalTech, MIT, and others.  Cooperative education programs provide employers with prospective employees trained in the latest techniques and educational institutions with motivated students and financial backing.  In completing the required two semesters of this course, students will gain practical knowledge about the use of GIS in an area of their interest.  Assessment will be based primarily upon feedback from program cooperators and the final presentation of their project


Orbital Mechanics


REM
501


Online


MAT 205 and 206 (Calculus), PHY 231 and 232 (General Physics) or equivalents


Uses elementary principles of mathematics, physics, and mechanics to introduce  traditional science required to place a spacecraft into orbit, keep it there, determine its position, and maneuver it.  Course provides a basic understanding of orbital mechanics. Simple principles  of the process are introduced to allow for understanding the more complex details of launching, tracking, maneuvering, and maintaining spacecraft orbits in daily operations.


Remote Sensing of the Environment


REM 511


Online


GIS 200 or 201 (GIS I), GIS 211 (Dig. Image. Proc I), REM 301 (Sensors and Platforms) or equivalents


A review of environmental mapping, monitoring and management techniques is provided, the principles and practice of environmental mapping, environmental surveys and the preparation of environmental impact statements.  The role of geospatial technology is examined. Remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) are used together to analyze data are demonstrated as powerful tools in environmental research. Mapping, monitoring and modeling environmental systems using remote sensing and GIS technologies to provide the essential geographic component of these activities forms the major focus of the laboratory activity.


Information Extraction using Microwave Data


REM
521


Online


GIS 200 or 201 (GIS I), REM 301 (Sensors and Platforms) or equivalents


Presents the basic concepts, theory and applications of microwave remote sensing.  Topics include:  Unique” aspects of microwave radiation, Passive microwave, Fundamental principles of microwave (active), Synthetic Aperture Radar, Backscatter principles and models, Interferometry, Phase relationships, Processing radar data, Environmental influences on radar returns and applications of these principles are presented.


Information Extraction using Multi-, Hyper-, Ultra-spectral Data


REM
531


Online


PHY 231 and 232 (Physics), GIS 211 (Dig Image Proc I), REM 301 (Sensors and Platforms) or equivalents


Information is the most significant product that is extracted from a remote sensing investigation and optical sensors measuring the visible and near infrared (VNIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum have been one of the most prolific producers of image data.  This course addresses the two main components of a VNIR remote sensing study: preparation of the imagery and information extraction techniques for both multi-spectral and hyper-spectral imagery.


Advanced Sensor Systems and Data Collection


REM
541


Online


PHY 231 and 232 (Physics), REM 301 (Sensors and Platforms) or equivalents


The newest active and passive sensors including advanced synthetic aperture radar, lidar, radiometers, spectrometers, microwave sounders, advanced hyperspectral sensors, and the advanced platforms which carry these sensors are presented. The mathematical theory behind sensors such as RADAR, LIDAR, and synthetic aperture radar interferometry operations and will illustrate sensors and platforms using as examples the current advanced sensors aboard satellites such as ENVISAT, GRACESAT, and ADEOS I and II.  Operation of advanced aircraft and balloon payloads such as TOP HAT and BOOMERANG are also investigated. 


Applications of Remote Sensing to Ecological Modeling


REM
551


Online


PHY 202, or BIO 111 or 201 or 449, REM 310 or 311 (Remote Sensing) or equivalents


Techniques and applications of remote sensing to a broad spectrum of issues related to ecological modeling are presented. Topics include: components of an ecosystem and interactions among those components, the suite of data sets available for mapping terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, ecosystem metrics that can be derived from the latter data, and methods for modeling individual species, multiple species, communities, and ecosystems, opportunities for applying remote sensing data and the constraints on its use, the use of applications to guide ecological assessments, decision-making, and adaptive management. Concepts are reinforced with case studies at multiple spatial and temporal levels.


Forestry Monitoring & Management


REM
561


Online


REM 310 or 311 (Remote Sensing), BIO 449 or Forest Management, or equivalents


Fundamental principles of photographic and non-photographic remote sensing, the application of these principles to specifically to detect, map, measure, and monitor forest tree, stand, and canopy attributes. Other topics include: multi-sensor applications in forestry and natural resources monitoring, historical development of remote sensing in forestry;  biophysical and reflectance properties of forest types; photogrammetric and photo interpretation principles; forest mapping non-photographic sensor systems including their particular advantages in forest applications; forest monitoring at the local, regional and global level; and forest resource information systems for decision support, the integration of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) in forest monitoring and forest information systems for decision support.


Agricultural Applications in Remote Sensing


REM
571


Online


MAT 104 (Algebra) and 105 (Trigonometry), CHE 100 or 101 (Chemistry), PHY 231 and 232 (General Physics) or equivalents


The applications of remote sensing, global positioning system technologies and geographic information systems (GIS) for the management and conservation of soil, vegetation and water resources that are important to agricultural production; the use of these technologies for inventorying and monitoring agricultural conditions for improving the information base on a local, regional and global basis; and for decision-making in the management of agricultural conditions at different spatial, spectral and temporal resolutions.


Land Use and Land Cover Applications 


REM
581


Online


REM 310 or 311 (Remote Sensing) or equivalent


The fundamental issues in creating, updating, assessing, and using land cover and land use information that has been derived from remotely sensed data. Topics include: brief histories of land use and land cover information; data exploration and image classification; detecting change in land use and land cover;  Accuracy and assessment of land use and land cover; information is also examined, including a discussion on analysis systems.  The course also addresses the use of information for predictions of the impact of future decisions and prescriptions for best land management practices and goals.  Concepts are illustrated with detailed real world case studies and student exercises.


Remote Sensing of Water


REM
591


Online


None


An overview of how satellite remote-sensing technologies may be used for the study and monitoring of surface waters (rivers, streams, lakes and wetlands). The remote sensing of snow and ice is also covered. Topics include: an overview of the societal and scientific importance of surface water, including pressing issues, linkages to climate and biogeochemical cycles, and the hydrologic cycle, satellite remote sensing fundamentals including physics of the electromagnetic spectrum, solar and atmospheric effects and resolution trade-offs,  passive remote sensing of thermal and microwave energy, and RADAR and LIDAR active remote sensing technologies, common hydrologic and water resource applications for observing inundation extent, certain aspects of water quality, watershed characteristics, river hydraulics, floodplain dynamics, and snow cover from space.